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 Proposal of 10-mile, 25-mile, 50-mile records
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upright mike

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2012 :  07:31:06  Show Profile
Similar to my other proposal to recognize 100-mile distance records, I propose that the IHPVA recognize 10-mile, 25-mile, 50-mile records. These records will hold an interest in the following regions of the world: US=United States and UK=United Kingdom (England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales). There are an abundance of cycling events, including time trials, that cover these distances. Several organizations and clubs in these regions have established records for these distances. See my other thread: Proposal of 100-mile records http://www.ihpva.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=537" for some references.

Below would be the 10-mile, 25-mile, 50-mile "world records" for human powered vehicles, ie Cycling World Records. All would be held by

Francesco Russo, Eiviestretto (streamlined human powered vehicle), Dektra test track, set August 02, 2011

10-mile Bicycle Time Trial (TT) world record*:
Francesco Russo, 10 minutes 58 seconds, Avg Speed = 54.678 mph, 87.996 kph

25-mile Bicycle Time Trial (TT) world record*:
Francesco Russo, 26 minutes 28 seconds, Avg Speed = 56.676 mph, 91.211 kph

50-mile Bicycle Time Trial (TT) world record*:
Francesco Russo, 52 minutes 48 seconds, Avg Speed = 56.824 mph, 91.449 kph

*these world records are unofficial. They were created by myself, not approved by the IHPVA or any other organization. I used interpolation of Lap time data to compute the above times, thus they are estimates. Accurate 10-mile, 25-mile times for Damjan Zabovnik and accurate 50-mile times for Sam Whittingham were obtained at the Ford test track (each lap = 5.00 miles) in July 2009. Hence these marks show on the Image below could also be recognized as the official records. However, each has a slower average speed than Francesco.

http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f152/uprightmike/CyclingTimeTrialsRecordsIII.jpg


Edited by - upright mike on 01/07/2012 08:17:13

Don S

USA
83 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2012 :  17:08:25  Show Profile
It's unfortunate that these distances don't convert evenly to kilometers. The closest metric equivalents to the 10, 25, 50, and 100 mile distances would be the 16k, 40k, 80k and 160k.

The 200 M is a popular bench mark of human power achievement. Similarly, a 25k, 50k, 100k, and 200k, which is just over 125 miles, might have more appeal across a broader community.

Maybe someone from the metric world will post opinion.

Don

"it's important to understand what makes them fast. It's more important to understand what keeps them from going faster." DS
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upright mike

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 01/08/2012 :  08:00:36  Show Profile
I learned yesterday that Chris Boardman's 25-mile road record (45:57) was broken in 2009. So I should ammend my graphic above. New mark is

25-mile UK record:
45 minutes, 54 seconds, David McCann, 32.68 mph

Interestingly enough, Michael Hutchinson, another strong TT rider with numerous records almost broke the record as well with a 46:07 time.
reference: http://www.bikeradar.com/news/article/uk-time-trial-round-up-boardmans-25-record-falls-23293/

There times are significantly faster than the US national 40K record which is about (24.85 miles) the equivalent distance. Part of the reason may our fastest 40K course has a 180 deg turnaround that slows down the riders. see below.

US 40K National record:
47 minutes 35.37 seconds John Frey, 1990, 31.33 mph

I agree with Don's thoughts about looking at equivalent metric distances. Interestingly, the 20K and 40K Time Trial (TT) has significant interest here in the U.S. (even though we are not on the metric system!) There are State and National championships at these distances, usually divided into categories for Junior, Adult, Masters, Category 1-2, Category 3, Category 4, 5, Men's, Womens, Tandems, etc. Many of us have done these upright cycling events with our stock unfaired recumbents.

These courses tend to be two types:
Out and Back - with a 180 degree turnaround on a two-lane road. These are common as they allow less road closure (only a single road can be used, rerouting traffic to an alternate parallel road). The 180 degree turns can slow down a long-wheelbase recumbent, and can be impossible to negotiate in a streamliner with limited steering lock.

Loop - multiple 90 degree turns on a road course tha uses several roads going around some area, sometimes a lake or farm country where there is minimal impact to the interior area by road closures for the event. Riders can maintain higher speeds on these courses versus a 180 deg turnaround course.

The fastest 20K / 40K course in the country is usually considered to be the Moriarity, New Mexico course which hosts an annual early September event called the Record Challenge. The course is at a high elevation (over 6000 foot), and is very flat, with dry desert air. It is an out and back course, so riders are slowed by the 180 deg turnarounds.

Here are the best records set there:
http://www.nmcycling.org/RecordChallenge/records.html

Edited by - upright mike on 01/09/2012 05:24:17
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Mr Larrington

Christmas Island
4 Posts

Posted - 01/09/2012 :  01:48:47  Show Profile  Visit Mr Larrington's Homepage
Laurent Chapuis in Nilgo II did a 37:07 open road 25 during the European Championships in 1996.

--
Satisfying the bloodlust of the masses in peacetime
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Mr Larrington

Christmas Island
4 Posts

Posted - 01/10/2012 :  04:20:23  Show Profile  Visit Mr Larrington's Homepage
Most, if not all, CTT-sanctioned British TT courses are of the out-and-back variety. Roads are open to all traffic; generally the turn is at a roundabout so the rider doesn't have to slow down so much. The fastest British courses are on fairly busy dual carriageways (divided highways); passing traffic gives a bit of extra push.

Time-trialling has traditionally been the favourite form of cycle racing in the UK as it's pretty difficult to get police permission for even a rolling road closure. The number of complaints received about both the Tour de France running a stage from London to Canterbury and the trial on the Olympic road race course was quite substantial.

The Mersey Roads 24H uses three loops, a main daylight one, a shorter night one and a finishing loop close to race HQ.

--
Satisfying the bloodlust of the masses in peacetime
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